The dismantling of net neutrality and what you can still do

Net neutrality has been on everyone’s mind these days, since commissioners at the US Federal Communications Commission have voted to overturn rules that would force ISPs to treat all data traffic as equal.

“This is the right way to go,” said FCC chairman Ajit Pai ahead of the vote on May 18th, quoted by BBC. In an official statement, FCC officials added that they expected the proposed changes to “substantially benefit consumers and the marketplace”. They also mentioned that before the rules were changed in 2015, they helped to preserve a “flourishing free and open internet for almost 20 years”.

 

But what is net neutrality and why is it important to us, Internet users?

It’s simple. When we go online, we have certain expectations. We want to be able to connect to any site we want, without any data restrictions from ISPs, because we expect to be in control of our Internet experience.

This is basically what net neutrality is. This basic principle prohibits Internet Service Providers like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from speeding up, slowing down or blocking any content, applications or websites you want to use. Net Neutrality is the way that the internet has always worked, preserving our right to communicate freely online.

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CyberGhost is actively supporting the freedom of information in Ukraine

[ press release published on May 18th 2017; for more press updates, go to our dedicated website section ]

CyberGhost is watching closely the developments going on in the last few days in Ukraine and faithful to its mission is making sure the citizens of the world don’t get affected by Internet services limitations.

“In the first 24 hours since the block started, based on our growth in terms of users and freely available data, we estimate that over 2,000,000 persons have installed a VPN just on desktop. Many more are installing VPN solutions also on their mobile devices. Right now, in the top 7 applications on Apple store, 4 of them are VPN service providers”, said Robert Knapp, the CEO of the privacy solution company.

CyberGhost is one of the world’s most reliable privacy and security solutions in the world.

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Robert Knapp @MVP Academy Demo Day 2017

CyberGhost VPN is proud to support, yet again, the local Romanian startup market through the the MVP Academy acceleration program.

After holding 1-on-1 mentoring sessions with the MVP Academy selected tech startups, the CyberGhost CEO, Robert Knapp, was also a keynote speaker at MVP Academy Demo Day 2017.

The event brought together over 500 tech professionals from the local ecosystem and the region as well. Investors, successful entrepreneurs, journalists, C-level execs and community leaders joined the event to feel the vibe of the local ecosystem and meet the startups.

So here is his inspirational speech on CyberGhost’s very own success story, from startup to million-dollar company. Enjoy!

New UK law: 10 years in jail for those who stream content illegally

The EU and UK are taking some radical measures aimed at those who wish to stream copyright-protected content. At the end of April, the Court of Justice of the European Union has categorically ruled that the temporary reproduction of copyright-protected work – without the consent of the rights holder – cannot be deemed as exempt from “right of reproduction”.

On May 4th, The British Government’s Digital Economy Act received royal assent, meaning anyone caught sharing illegal files in the UK could now be imprisoned for up to 10 years. Until now, the maximum jail term for copyright infringement was 2 years.

Although the new bill is mainly aimed at stopping those distributing content illegally, end users could also end up in trouble.

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The fight against censorship continues: access Wikipedia with CyberGhost

After recently blocking access to Dutch-based online hotel booking platform booking.com, the Turkish government has now banned access to Wikipedia links. This came as a consequence of the online encyclopedia’s refusal to delete articles and comments that suggest the country is co-operating with “terrorist groups”.

Reportedly, Turkish officials have been in contact with the site’s administrators on numerous occasions to ask them to take down the disputed content, but Wikipedia has refused to comply.

The state-run Anadolou Agency in Turkey quotes Turkish officials from the Department of Communications as saying that Wikipedia has “has started acting as part of the circles who carry out a smear campaign against Turkey in the international arena, rather than being cooperative in fight against terror.”

When attempting to access the webpage using Turkish internet providers, users received a notice the site could not be reached and a “connection timed out” error.

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Congrats to the winners of the Travel with Bender competition!

First of all, thank you to all the Ghosties out there who took part in the contest organized by our partners, Travel with Bender!

As you know, CyberGhost VPN allows you to easily encrypt your online connection, increasing your digital privacy and security. It’s trusted by millions of users all over the world… including Travel With Bender.

So, we are pleased to announce the winners of the Travel with Bender competition!

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Russia may start banning VPNs

According to certain online sources, the Russian government is working on a bill which requires VPNs and other anonymizing services to stop providing access to blocked domains. If they don’t, they will also end up being blocked. Search engines are also on the black list if they link to the banned websites.

This measure has been taken as a consequence of the fact that many Russians are trying to access censored websites with the help of VPNs, proxies, mirror sites and anonymity networks such as Tor.

The technical aspects of the bill were reportedly formulated by lawyers working for the Media Communications Union (MCU), a trade group established by the largest media companies in the country. The MCU has a particular interest in ensuring that web users do not bypass pirate site blockades by using anonymous web-based CGI proxies.

The new bill apparently lays out a new framework which will force search engines to remove frowned-upon links. Failing to do so could result in fines of up to $12,400 per breach, clearly a significant issue for companies such as Google and local search giant Yandex.

#Russia may ban VPNs soon. Search engines are also on the black list. Fines of up to $12,400 per breach! Click to Tweet

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