Torrents and political media, the world’s most censored digital content

It’s no secret that censorship thrives around the world. An updated map of global Internet censorship in 2017 has recently been published by a hosting website and by simply giving the statistics a look, one can see that torrents are by far the most frowned upon online. This kind of censorship is probably the only one to occur in those generally regarded as democratic countries.

It’s easy to understand why torrents are the ones to suffer various forms of censorship around the world. Copyright-protected materials such as movies, music or software licenses are probably the main source of income for everyone involved in their creative & development process and piracy would only come in the way of profit.

Other reasons for this type of censorship include a so-called state-enforced morality, which implies that citizens are not capable of deciding what’s good and what’s bad for them. This kind of justification not only refers to the censorship of torrents, but also to social and political media.

Worldwide, the list of Internet censorship looks as follows:

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How to earn money with CyberGhost VPN

If you manage a travel-oriented location, tourist attraction or any other brick-and-mortar business that offers free WiFi services, join the CyberGhost Safe WiFi Project and earn up to $50 for each new CyberGhost Premium purchase.

Here’s how the CyberGhost Safe WiFi Project works:

  1. Create an account on our website in just 10 minutes.
  2. Place an announcement on your free WiFi landing page and start making money immediately.
  3. To maximize your profit even further, place printed promotional materials about CyberGhost in your location, in whichever form you prefer.

And that’s it! You will be rewarded with up to 50$ for every purchase of a CyberGhost subscription.

It really can’t get any easier to keep clients happy and safe, while also earning a profitable commission for your business. Join the risk-free CyberGhost Safe WiFi Project!

Digital freedom is in bloom and comes at a 57% discount

The season of changes is finally here and some spring cleaning is more than welcome.

Make sure that you no longer leave unwanted data behind from now on and get your Premium/Premium Plus CyberGhost VPN subscription at a 57% discount.

With one simple effort, you will get a whole year of benefits:

  • Extra speed thanks to 5x faster servers
  • Apps for Android and iOS, included
  • No annoying ads
  • Access to more than 700 servers in 27 countries
  • Mobile data cost reduction through data compression
  • All of the above, on 5 different devices for Premium Plus subscriptions

Get CyberGhost Premium and unblock content from all over the world!

WikiLeaks opens Vault 7, exposes CIA hacking tools

WikiLeaks has begun a new series of leaks on the US Central Intelligence Agency, code-named Vault 7.

The first full part of the series, “Year Zero”, is made up of a massive amount of over 8,000 documents from an isolated, high-security network located inside the CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence in Langley, Virgina.

According to a press release from WikiLeaks, recently, the CIA lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal including malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized “zero day” exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation. Zero-day flaws are previously undiscovered vulnerabilities in software, which can be exploited to alter the behavior of a product and the WikiLeaks document shows that the CIA has built up a significant stockpile of zero-day flaws to use for surveillance.

“Year Zero” brings forth the weaponized exploits against a wide range of U.S. and European company products, include Apple’s iPhone, Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows and even Samsung TVs, which are turned into undercover microphones.

Here are some of the most important documents set to be brought forth by WikiLeaks:

 

iPhones, Android devices and smart TVs, the main targets of the CIA malware

It appears that the CIA has developed a software capable of spying on just about every piece of electronic equipment people use, from smartphones to routers and smart TVs. Thus, everything recorded by those devices, from deliberately sent messages, user location to everything we say or do near those gadget’s microphones and cameras can become accessible to the US intelligence agency.

Samsung smart TVs for instance get infected with the “Weeping Angel” malware, developed by the CIA’s Embedded Devices Branch (EDB). Weeping Angel places the target TV in a ‘Fake-Off’ mode, so that the owner falsely believes the TV is off when it is on. In ‘Fake-Off’ mode the TV operates as a bug, recording conversations in the room and sending them over the Internet to a covert CIA server.

Your #TV could be spying on you even when it's off. Find out how from the #WikiLeaks #Vault7 dumps Click to Tweet
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Our Bucharest NoSpy servers to go under maintenance, but for a good cause

The Ghostie team has grown over the years and we now need a bigger (and of course cooler) brand new office with enough room for everybody. That is why we’ve already packed our bags and we’ll move everything between March 10th and 13th.

No worries, Ghosties! The magic will still happen, but in a way cooler location, worthy of digital freedom fighters. Stay tuned for more!

However, since we’re taking our NoSpy Servers with us, they will become unavailable during the above-mentioned period (so only for 3 days). Everything else will work just fine, though, so continue using your favorite VPN throughout all your favorite online activities, just like before.

We are sorry for the inconvenience this may cause you, but the world’s first NoSpy servers will be back in no time, and they will protect your online identity from an even more secure location.

We know that you’ll forgive us though, especially because as soon as we get settled in our new headquarters, we’ll update you with pictures. Make sure to also follow us on our social media channels so that you never miss a CyberGhost update: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and Google Plus.

Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: Teddy bears leak 2 million voice messages and more

The Internet of Things continues to show that it will probably be the biggest threat to our privacy in the future. That is why we should think twice before purchasing the next Internet-connected gadget, or even worse, IoT toys for our children. Such devices can be very easily transformed into spying tools.

Why did we feel the need for such a warning, at this time in particular? Just have a look at one of the most important updates of the week and you will understand:

Millions of voice messages and passwords leaked through Internet of Toys

CloudPets, a company that sells “smart” teddy bears has leaked 800,000 user account credentials, which hackers then locked it and held for ransom. The toys allow children and relatives to send recorded voicemails back and forth.

This same incident happened over a year ago, when Hong Kong toymaker VTech was hacked, exposing snaps of parents and their children as well as chat logs. An estimate of 6.4 million were affected by this hack last year.

Find out how to avoid the dangers brought by the Internet of Toys from here.

 

Digital privacy, threatened by new FCC Chairman

U.S. regulators just blocked some Obama administration rules on the eve of implementation, regulations that would have subjected broadband providers to stricter scrutiny than web sites face to protect customers’ private data.

In other words, ISPs would have carte blanche when it comes to rifling through, sharing, and selling your private data.

Electronic Frontier Foundation is encouraging people to take action and tell their Congress representatives that they will not accept their efforts to undermine online privacy acts. Take action at this link.

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Millennials, willing to sacrifice privacy on the altar of personalization?

Millennials, or those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter, are  a generation expected to change the world as we know it. Although they are quite hard to define at the moment, we know one thing for sure: millennials are the most connected of recent generations, mobile by definition, “preferring and expecting the world to be available to them on their mobile devices”, according to a study developed by CSG International.

However, being mobile-native comes at a certain cost. The study quoted above shows that millennials love having everything personalized and are likely to share data in exchange for such benefits.

Yes, you read correctly. In exchange for small recommendations, millennials from the US are apparently willing to relinquish their privacy. Of course, one can only wonder how representative the study performed by CSG International actually is, since it surveyed nearly 1,000 millennials, out of whom only a few over 200 were from the US, but come to think about it, this result does not seem too far-fetched.

Here are some personal details millennials appear to be willing to share:

  • Their location – 85% of American participants said that millennials would be very likely or somewhat likely to allow their mobile service provider to use their location services to provide small conveniences, such as a pop up prompt saying “I see you have a flight in 24 hours, would you like to check in for your flight now?”
  • The content that they enjoy – 86% of US respondents said that millennials would be very likely or somewhat likely to allow their mobile service provider to make entertainment recommendations based on content they’ve watched or listened to before.
  • Mobile data usage – 63% of US respondents said that millennials would be very likely or somewhat likely to allow their mobile service provider to use their mobile data to track websites visited and other usage data to provide insights to advertisers to create personalized ads, tailored to individual interests.
  •  Browsing history – 86% of US respondents said that millennials would be very likely or somewhat likely to allow their mobile service provider to make entertainment recommendations based on content they’ve watched or listened to before, according to the study.
Would you share #PersonalData to receive #personalization perks from your apps? Click to Tweet

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