Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: Stricter privacy rules for Facebook and more

Even if the winter holidays are just around the corner and a breeze of hope and optimism seems to be in the air, privacy issues are happening at their usual pace. Here is what caught our attention in this week:

Snooper’s Charter already claims first victims

Hackers appear to already be exploiting the infamous Snooper’s Charter, by promoting fake privacy solutions to worried older Internet users across the UK, according to scmagazine.com.

In a recent survery, forty-four percent of over-55s said they would consider downloading software to protect themselves from government in a recent survey.

However, a VPN such as CyberGhost is the solution at-hand recommended by security experts.

Potentially stricter privacy rules for Facebook, WhatsApp and Skype

Popular platforms such as Google, Facebook and WhatsApp face a strict new privacy crackdown from the EU, as per some new proposals leaked from the European Commission.

The rules would force websites and browsers to ask for users’ consent before directing advertising at them based on their browser history. Users currently have to actively opt out of receiving such advertisements.

Read more on the topic here.

Online survey stirs privacy concerns in Canada

In Ottawa, the federal privacy commissioner is investigating the Liberals’ new online survey about the Canadians’ feelings towards electoral reform, as thestar.com shows.

Although the mydemocracy.ca website lists highly personal information such as household income, education, employment status and postal codes as optional, this information is actually required if respondents want their views meaningfully counted in.

So be careful what private data you hand out online, it could definitely end up in the wrong place.

Potentially stricter #privacy rules for #Facebook, #SnoopersCharter already claims victims. More in our… Click to Tweet

Camera manufacturers asked to include encryption features

The Freedom of the Press Foundation is asking major companies like Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Fujifilm to build encryption features into their products in a new open letter published this week.

The letter was signed by over 150 filmmakers and photojournalists, including Citizenfour director Laura Poitras.

Get more on the story from this link.

Kids can write to Santa online, but parents should watch for privacy policies

In a world ruled by technology, children can send their wish list to Santa, but they can also upload a letter to Rudolph from their pet, read Santa’s blog, watch live webcams or read his tweets on Twitter.

However, before allowing children to share any personal information with such websites,  BBB’s Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) recommends reviewing the website’s privacy policy first.

Read more on the topic here.

About the author

Corina Dumitrescu
Corina Dumitrescu

A professional wordsmith, Corina has improved her writing skills through extensive experiences in journalism, advertising and marketing. Curious by nature, she enjoys learning foreign languages and discovering everything, as well as everyone around her.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

© 2015 CyberGhost