Tag - net neutrality

Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: FCC’s final vote on net neutrality, Bitcoins under attack and new iOS vulnerability

It’s the holiday season and it seems, hackers enjoy it just as much as everybody else. A lot has happened in the cyber security world over the past week and some of the news are important and could have an impact on all of us.

Find out more below:

  1. Facebook and PayPal – vulnerable in front of 19-year old Robot RSA attack

A 19-year old vulnerability has come back and now hits some of the most popular websites, including Facebook and PayPal. The attack allows hackers to decipher encrypted data by providing “yes” or “no” answers until finally revealing private information. Read more about the news.

  1. Around 1 million passwords leaked on the dark web

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The end of net neutrality knocks on our doors

Update, December 15th: Despite everything, the inevitable occurred and the FCC’s final vote for dismantling net neutrality took place yesterday. U.S. ISPs have now full power to block websites, suppress services, and censor online content.

After the vote, it appears that several Republican voters declared to be against the resolution to put a stop to net neutrality. In addition, many attorney generals and state officials including members of the Congress plan to sue the FCC over the repeal.

The effects of the end of net neutrality will become official in a few months so maybe there is still hope.

However, CyberGhost VPN can still help you enjoy internet freedom like you used to and access any website you please.

As recently announced, the FCC had to come up with the final proposal regarding net neutrality until November 22nd. Yesterday, Ajit Pai announced that it will dismantle net neutrality rules, giving giant telecom and web companies full power on deciding what online content to deliver to their customers. Additionally, the end of net neutrality would mean that ISPs can either slow down or speed up web services at their own will. Clearly, only big companies will afford to offer the best connections to consumers.

FCC Chairman mentioned the new proposal would actually mean restoring internet freedom since it forces ISPs to be transparent on the costs they require users for each web service they provide. Customers can simply choose a service plan according to their needs and preferences. Basically, American citizens will pay different costs for a basic internet service and will have to pay more if they want to access music or movie websites, for example.

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How net neutrality issues in the U.S. can affect us all

Update, October 23rd, 2017:

According to latest news, by November 22nd, the chairman of the FCC will give an official response regarding net neutrality. In the case of a negative comeback which will put net neutrality to an end, that would mean internet service providers will charge U.S. citizens extra for accessing certain websites, apps or even streaming services.

If you want to put a stop to the vote that approves dissolving net neutrality, you can do that by giving as many calls to the U.S. Congress members through the official battle for the net website. Mention you are in favor of net neutrality and that you demand the FCC Chairman to quit his plan.

Article originally published on September 28th, 2017

The road to digital freedom is not straight. In fact, it is full of obstacles along with a new proposal set by the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The new rule is meant to put an end to net neutrality and let ISPs (Internet Service Providers) decide which online content their subscribers should have access to. Mainly, it gives them the right to promote their own services online and block their rivals.

In other words, ISPs will determine what you can see and read on the internet based on how much internet customers pay for.  So much for free speech and equal opportunities, not to mention the beginning of a censorship era in the online world.

What security specialists fear is that big companies will afford a toll given to ISPs, but small companies won’t. In a way, this is already happening. A few years ago, a news service run by Verizon banned web content regarding mass surveillance as ideas revealed in those websites opposed their interests. However, FCC’s Republican chairman Ajit Pai wants to make it all legal, even though FCC is the same authority that promised to protect net neutrality in 2015.

Why should you care about an internet freedom rule passed in the USA?

If you don’t live in the U.S., you may think this doesn’t concern you. Well, surprise! This decision will affect you too.

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There is still hope: Nevada fights back against ISP law

In the US, under Trump’s presidency, ISPs were recently given carte blanche to sell customer data. Thus, Internet privacy protection measures voted during Obama’s administration were repealed.

Counteractions did not hesitate to soon appear. Starting October, Nevada will force website owners to notify visitors about how they’re using their data.

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Online privacy in the time of Donald Trump

The election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States of America got everyone talking these days. What we would like to know, however, is what this decision entails on the online privacy front. Do we have any reasons to worry?


What Snowden thinks

Edward Snowden says we shouldn’t “fear” and just carry on fighting on our own for online privacy, without expecting unwitting saviors.

Speaking from Moscow on November 10, in a live stream hosted by private browser developer StartPage, the world’s most notorious whistleblower brought into everyone’s attention our hopes concerning President Obama, for instance, who once was expected to bring an end to mass surveillance.

Then, Snowden emphasized that Trump is only one president of a much bigger world and that privacy is a global matter: “This is just one president. Politicians do what they think will gain them support… ultimately if we want to see a change we must force it through.”

He thus brought into attention recent legislative changes in Russia and China, where regulations allowing mass surveillance were passed this year.

One cannot however not worry about Snowden’s own safety in Trump’s regime. Although admitting to being crazy to dismiss a potential deal between Trump and Putin for extradition and trial, Snowden quite optimistically conceded: “If I was worried about safety, if the security and the future of myself was all that I cared about, I would still be in Hawaii.”

On this topic, back in 2014, Trump tweeted: “Snowden is a spy who has caused great damage in the US. A spy in the old days, when our country was respected and strong, would be executed”.

What Trump himself says

During his campaign, Trump vowed to “eliminate our most intrusive regulations” and “reform the entire regulatory code,” as quoted by the Washington Post. He singled out net neutrality as a “top down power grab,” predicting it would allow the government to censor websites.

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