Tag - Internet Privacy

The best torrenting websites to use with CyberGhost

[ adapted after an original article written by Ulrich Brügmann on the German version of the CyberGhost blog ]

Torrents have always been a source of controversy, but this is unfortunately not a fully deserved bad reputation. Although they are best known as a means of distributing illegal content such as copyright-protected music or movies, peer-to-peer file sharing is also popular because the technology behind it has some considerable benefits.

Those who offer files through torrents thus distribute the required load of resources through a network of computers and thereby relieve the respective provider – which is why Linux files and other large types of documents are offered as torrents. Thus, instead of a single server that just goes down with new releases quickly, many individual computers take over the distribution and ensure noticeably faster download rates.

Even so, using torrents – or better, downloading files through torrents – is illegal in some countries. If not, their use is logged. Another downside: ISPs may take measures to throttle Internet speed when heavy torrent use is detected. Furthermore, they may choose to block certain torrent platforms.

Download torrents using a VPN

To avoid the above-mentioned disadvantages or unjustified warnings, it is recommended to use a good VPN for torrenting. Its purpose is to make you safe and anonymous online, but also to enable you to access regionally blocked torrent sites.

However, not all VPNs are appropriate for torrenting. Many block VPN traffic, just like regular Internet providers do, while others do not hesitate to close user accounts they suspect of P2P file sharing. This means that in spite of probably promoting the fact that they do not monitor their users’ traffic, these VPN providers actually do, otherwise how would they know the websites their users are accessing?

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The end of an era? ISPs get green light to sell users’ web history

UPDATE, March 29th: Less than a week after the Senate voted to empower internet service providers to freely share private user data with advertisers, the House has weighed in, too. Now, only a signature from the president stands in the way of the repeal.

March 23rd is a day that will go down in history. The US Senate has voted to eliminate broadband privacy rules that would have required ISPs (Internet Service Providers) to get consumers’ explicit consent before selling or sharing web browsing data and other private data with advertisers as well as other companies. Seems that the UK’s Snooper’s Charter was only the beginning of a much more worrying global trend.

ISP now stands for “invading subscriber privacy”

… in the words of senator Ed Markey, a Democrat.

The Republican-controlled Senate voted along party lines to repeal Internet privacy protections that were approved by the Federal Communications Commission just days before Donald Trump won the election.

The rules, which had not yet gone into effect, would have required Internet service providers to get the person’s permission before collecting and sharing personal data on everything from web browsing history to geo-location information.

Providers would also have been required to notify customers about the types of information collected and shared.

But on March 23rd all this turned into a mere dream. The Senate prevents all of these rules from taking effect, unless the House or President Trump decide otherwise. And we strongly doubt the latter would happen.

#ISP now stands for Invading Subscriber Privacy. Reclaim your right to #InternetPrivacy with #CyberGhost Click to Tweet


The repeal happened to avoid “confusion” among people

The Senate measure was introduced two weeks ago by Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and 23 Republican co-sponsors. Flake said at the time that he is trying to “protect consumers from overreaching Internet regulation.”

President Trump’s FCC Chairman Ajit Pai argues that consumers would be confused if there are different privacy rules for ISPs than for online companies like Google and Facebook. “American consumers should not have to be lawyers or engineers to figure out if their information is protected” Pai recently declared. 

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