Tag - EU

Article 13 – Changes in EU copyright law can end your freedom of expression online

Update, June 21st: 

The European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs voted in favor of Article 13 yesterday.  This isn’t a final vote, but since the committee decided to push Article 13 forward, it seems there is only one small step to the final stage of the legislation process.

Changes in Article 13 won’t become official until next month, when the general assembly of the Parliament gives the last vote. One way to reverse the decision would be if all 751 MEPs agree to dissolve the controversial article and let the world wide web the way it is.

So, there is still time. Convince your MEP to vote against Article 13!

Update, June 18th: 

Several digital activists have been warning us about Article 13 from EU’s copyright law since last year.

If you think it’s nothing important, think again! This could highly impact your entire web experience.

Imagine you have to pay a fee to online platforms and websites for every little piece of content you take over from them. Whether you use short snippets of text from an original article as part of a link in one of your posts (it could be blog article or social media post) or upload a photo or a video on your platform. Up until now it was considered fair and legal to simply mention the source. However, Article 13 wants everyone to pay for all these small bits of content everyone is supposed to be free to use.

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Implementation of ePrivacy Regulation – re-gain control over your personal data

A privacy law proposed by the European Commission is about to set a new model in terms of online privacy for people residing in Europe. The ePrivacy Regulation was initially drafted in 2002 and was revised in 2009. In the beginning of 2017, the EU updated the text and introduced new policies regarding users’ prior consent when it comes to websites and marketing companies processing and controlling their own personal data.

The updates will bring significant changes to the web surfing activity, if they are indeed accepted. The legislation still needs to be approved by the member states during a vote that will be held in a Parliament plenary session in Strasbourg next week.

These new privacy proposals align with changes suggested by the GDPR (EU General Data Protection Regulation); the organization has as main aim to make sure EU citizens enjoy online privacy and are protected from data breaches. The difference between the two is that GDPR wants to enhance Article 8 of the European Charter of Human Rights referring to personal data protection, while the ePrivacy regulation is meant to complement Article 7 of the charter in respect to a person’s private life.

The fundamental changes of the ePrivacy rules refer to:

  1. Cookies law – give your consent for web tracking

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