Tag - chrome

Free Chrome and Firefox Browser Plugins… from CyberGhost!

Update, August 14th, 2018:

Along with our Chrome proxy, you can now use the Firefox browser plugin to surf the web anonymously. CyberGhost Proxy Plugins allow you to encrypt your browser traffic, so you can be sure that no online snooper can see where you go on the web.

Both browser extensions are FREE to use and available worldwide, including in internet-censored countries, such as Turkey, the United Arab Emirates or Iran.

CyberGhost Browser Plugins were built on Ethereum blockchain which is a guarantee that your data stays private as the app runs exactly as programmed without any possibility of censorship, fraud or third-party interference.

According to w3schools.com, 80% of online users have Chrome as their main web browser , followed by Firefox, with 10% of online users(July 2018).

Original post from August 23rd, 2014:

We’ve had many requests from our friends lately regarding a Chrome app. We put deep thoughts into this project and asked our awesome German development team to build a steady, no logs, bug free Chrome Proxy. The result can be found on the Chrome store so please, do test it and give us feedback!

Just click on the Power button and you will instantly connect to a CyberGhost server. Choose a server location and your IP will be changed in a second.

You can connect to a server from the following countries:

  • Germany
  • Netherlands
  • Romania
  • United States

The CyberGhost Chrome and Firefox Proxy Plugins are:

  • Free
  • Easy to install
  • Good for unblocking online content
  • Gives you a new Ip within seconds
  • Encrypts your online browsing data, with 256-bit AES encryption

But please be careful:

  • Please note that these browser plugins are not secure when accessing Flash content and does not protect you from webRTC leaks.
  • In addition, (apart from exceptional situations such as your proximity to the server that provides streaming content) you won’t be able to connect to streaming channels.

For full online protection, we recommend you to install our desktop and mobile VPN solution: CyberGhost VPN.

Chrome Private browsing doesn’t protect your privacy. Are we doomed?

Chrome pic

 

What? But I thought that was the whole purpose of Chrome private browsing mode, Incognito.

That’s actually what everybody thought. But it turns out Incognito mode doesn’t keep you that private after all. It’s more like a hideout from your work colleagues or family, because the ISP can still see all the websites you’ve lusciously browsed, along with your boss and government.

Did you know that your Internet Service Provider (a.k.a. ISP) can see your entire browsing history and online traffic? Unless you hide your IP and use confirmed privacy solution, you stand no chance to keep your online life private. Read More

WebRTC Leak: Are you affected?

A lot of fuss for little trouble: Browser video chat renders VPN worthless, it says. Or: Firefox and Chrome reveal original IP address. Or: Deanonymisation via WebRTC. However: Turns out, very few are affected, because the vast majority operates behind a router and it is shielded by default – and even those, who actually are affected, can resolve the issue with little effort.

So, what’s this all about?

It’s about WebRTC, a video chat technique for real time communication directly inside modern browsers like Firefox and Chrome, which, as a side effect, can help to unveil a user’s original IP address, even though she or he is camouflaged by a VPN. Theoretically. In the real world the possible leak just affects users who are directly connected to the Internet with a modem. The WebRTC makes it possible to read all registered IP addresses inside the network card. All others should be safe, even though they use one of the mentioned browsers. From behind a router, all WebRTC is going to see will be in most cases a bunch of local IP addresses, such as 192.168.178.xxx and alike, which are common in all local networks and therefore worthless in terms of tracking.

U test

If your browser is affected, can be tested very fast on the CyberGhost WebRTC IP detection page. Just open your browser and visit this page: WebRTC Real IP Detection.

webrtc_detection_01

 

If your real IP is exposed, start CyberGhost, clean your browser’s cache (by hitting ‘F5’) and visit the page again. If you’re unlucky and your IP is still exposed, install either the WebRTC Block plug-in for Chrome or the Disable WebRTC plug-in for Firefox.

webrtc_detection_02

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