Author - Dana Vioreanu

CyberGhost VPN, currently blocked in Turkey

Ghosties, both CyberGhost app and website have been blocked in Turkey since yesterday. We are currently working to fix this problem. Until this issue is solved, you can use our Chrome and Firefox browser extensions which allow you to surf the web anonymously.

We’ll make sure to keep you updated on this matter!

Short history of internet censorship in Turkey

In Turkey, the government is in complete control of citizens’ access to online content and also of their level of digital privacy.

As an example, the Turkish government requires IPSs to keep the activity logs of all users for 2 years and these logs can be checked by the government at any time if they require. The web traffic is also filtered by the government and some websites are always blocked.

Over the years, internet censorship and freedom of speech have turned to be worse and worse. By 2017, Turkey hold the 155th position in the world based on freedom index.

Why is a VPN the optimal solution for internet freedom?

Many Turkish citizens have relied on VPNs in order to enjoy complete online freedom. By using CyberGhost VPN, you can hide your IP, connect to one of our numerous servers from over 50 countries and access basic websites such as YouTube, Facebook, etc. Plus, CyberGhost provides a secure connection and you can be sure that you’ll remain anonymous online thanks to our features, such as “Block online tracking”.

#Turkish government to #blockVPNs again!Give us a feedback or comment if you are facing with this situation Click to Tweet

Unfortunately, many VPNs including CyberGhost have been blocked by the government in the past.

We appreciate your feedback so far and if you are affected by this situation, please give us a comment and tell us more about it!

Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: A cyberattack disrupts the Winter Olympics ceremony and more

Hackers continue to do what they know best, whether they’re trying to steal money online or make a statement. However, there is a piece of good news, as Germany has recorded another triumph over Facebook’s policy that compels users to reveal their real name.

Read below to find out more about what happened lately in terms of online threats and vulnerabilities.

India’s digital identity database can be easily hacked

India has a national digital identity project called Aadhaar that registers and archives nationals’ financial and personal data. Reporters from The Tribune discovered a loophole as they tested the system and managed to access information regarding any Aadhaar cardholder. Due to their discovery, journalists have been accused of forgery by Indian government agencies.

More on this news.

Germany wins a fight with Facebook over users’ right to use fake names

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Watch the Super Bowl 2018 with CyberGhost!

Americans are looking forward to the first biggest sports event of the year: the Super Bowl is this Sunday, February 4th. American or not, it’s almost impossible to not have heard of the incredible hysteria that goes on around this great annual sport event. Utterly advertised, with a long history and tradition, the Super Bowl is the annual championship game of the National Football League NFL.

Now, you may not be an American football fan, but the Super Bowl is an event in itself. Why? Because the Super Bowl is not all about football.

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Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: Dutch spies knew Russian hackers interfered in US elections and more

A lot has happened, and secrets were revealed in the cyber security world as well over the last seven days. Here are some notable news you should be aware about:

The biggest cryptocurrency hack targeted Coincheck

Apparently, some of the predictions in terms of cyber-attacks are starting to come true. Hackers are targeting cryptocurrencies and the biggest hack has just hit Coincheck – a Tokyo-based cryptocurrency exchange. Hackers stole digital assets worth of $532 million, but it affected the entire cryptocurrency market, including the Bitcoin price.

More on the news.

CrossRAT malware hits Windows, macOS and other systems

A new malware called CrossRAT has hit Windows, macOS, Solaris and Linux systems. CrossRAT is a Trojan developed by a group called Dark Caracal, allowing hackers to handle file systems as they please and run random executables. In addition, they use social engineering posting on Facebook and sending messages on WhatsApp, encouraging users to access fake and harmful websites.

Check out more details.

Dutch spies knew that Russians hackers influenced U.S. elections

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Happy Data Privacy Day! Time to value more and protect your digital data

Interested in reading a good story? I’m up for an intriguing tale anytime. I bet you’re going to enjoy the one below because it’s a story about you.

You wake up every day, go to work, maybe have a fight with a colleague or your boss; then chat with your friends. Some nights you go out and have fun, others, you spend indoors and watch a movie. Every day is more or less the same, over and over again. But this is just the big picture and they say that details count the most; they’re the ones that make a valid story.

Your daily habits say a lot, if not everything about your personality, personal preferences and even political beliefs. And today, all these details are exposed in the digital world.

Here is how. If you have a daily routine (or at least similar) to the one bellow, maybe you should consider some useful advice:

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Risks of Bitcoins – how you can solve privacy issues with a VPN

A long time ago, pirates used to dig up for hidden treasures. Pirates of today are mining Bitcoins. Yet, it’s not just the miners that can come into possession of Bitcoins. Anyone with internet and the willingness to take the shot can have a Bitcoin. The idea of digital money was highly likely to stir a frenzy among all kinds of people, not just investors.

Bitcoins became more and more famous as time went by and ever since their price soared to over $ 18.000, naturally, more and more people started to view Bitcoins as the new gold.

However, as with everything that is strictly digital, Bitcoins involve some risks you should be aware of if you’re interested in dealing with cryptocurrencies, whether you’re buying or selling.

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Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: the NSA just got an extension on their right to online monitoring and more

2018 has nearly started but don’t think for a second that hackers waste any time. Malware attacks will definitely continue to be on hackers’ list this year and the future doesn’t sound bright for Americans in terms of digital privacy.

Here are some of the major online risks that happened so far:

Hackers still search for credit card information

LockPoS started to make damages since 2017, but was only recently discovered. Constantly looking for data that looks like credit card details, LockPoS malware steals payment card information from the memory of computers; and it has been doing that so well that it was quite difficult to detect.

Read more on this news.

Americans’ human rights diminished even more

Online privacy in the United States is simply sinking deeper and deeper. Yesterday, the House of Representatives voted in favor of extending the NSA’s right of extended online surveillance for the next six years.

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