Author - Corina Dumitrescu

The best torrenting websites to use with CyberGhost

[ adapted after an original article written by Ulrich Brügmann on the German version of the CyberGhost blog ]

Torrents have always been a source of controversy, but this is unfortunately not a fully deserved bad reputation. Although they are best known as a means of distributing illegal content such as copyright-protected music or movies, peer-to-peer file sharing is also popular because the technology behind it has some considerable benefits.

Those who offer files through torrents thus distribute the required load of resources through a network of computers and thereby relieve the respective provider – which is why Linux files and other large types of documents are offered as torrents. Thus, instead of a single server that just goes down with new releases quickly, many individual computers take over the distribution and ensure noticeably faster download rates.

Even so, using torrents – or better, downloading files through torrents – is illegal in some countries. If not, their use is logged. Another downside: ISPs may take measures to throttle Internet speed when heavy torrent use is detected. Furthermore, they may choose to block certain torrent platforms.

Download torrents using a VPN

To avoid the above-mentioned disadvantages or unjustified warnings, it is recommended to use a good VPN for torrenting. Its purpose is to make you safe and anonymous online, but also to enable you to access regionally blocked torrent sites.

However, not all VPNs are appropriate for torrenting. Many block VPN traffic, just like regular Internet providers do, while others do not hesitate to close user accounts they suspect of P2P file sharing. This means that in spite of probably promoting the fact that they do not monitor their users’ traffic, these VPN providers actually do, otherwise how would they know the websites their users are accessing?

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Put privacy first in 2018 with our start-of-the-year deal

The most wonderful season of all is not over yet. You still have plenty of time to enjoy the magic of the winter holidays. You’ll probably spend most of your days in front of your laptop with a mug of hot chocolate. Maybe you have some more shopping to do or you just want to relax and watch your favorite movie series.

Regardless of your activity of choice, you surely need a friend by your side to safeguard all your digital activities. And that friend is CyberGhost VPN.

Why should you use CyberGhost every time you go online? Well, apart from the fact that the world wide web has gone a little mad and data breaches are recurrent, internet censorship is expanding. Why not kick start 2018 the right way to enjoy online privacy and browse the web without any restrictions?

With CyberGhost, you get to surf anonymously at the price of 1.99$/month. That’s right! We offer an 83% discount at our 7-year subscription plan. Quite a special offer for plenty of benefits CyberGhost VPN offers you, such as:

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Dreaming of a private Xmas? Make it happen with our 83% discount

The holiday season wouldn’t really be the same without all those presents left by “Santa” underneath the Christmas tree.

But most of the times, our busy lives don’t allow us to shop for all those goodies in person and ordering gifts online seems like the most time-efficient solution.

Yet that comes at a cost too. When we shop online, we leave our personal data and bank accounts exposed to hackers, who really don’t believe in such obsolete concepts as “Christmas kindness”.

However, there is a solution and a way to keep online snoopers at bay. A CyberGhost VPN subscription enables you to stay safe from online scams. Of course, we won’t magically refill your bank account, but we will keep it protected from digital thieves.

If this is a decision you’ve been postponing lately, now it’s the time to finally invest in a truly efficient and simple online privacy solution. Since we are having our Christmas sales, you can purchase a 7-year plan for a staggering 83% discount.

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Are you using MacOS High Sierra? Anyone could log into your device

Protecting our personal data requires much more than simply relying on an efficient online privacy tool such as CyberGhost VPN. We always have to make sure our devices are protected with strong passwords, that our operating systems are up-to-date so that security flaws are fixed, we should try not to connect to unprotected public WiFis, only visit HTTPS websites and of course, never go online without CyberGhost VPN.

However, sometimes, these measures may not be enough. The latest version of MacOS High Sierra – 10.13.1 (17B48), released in September – has a flaw which allows people to enter the word “root” when prompted for a username, and provide no password when logging on to the device. Once someone logs in, they’ve essentially authenticated themselves as the owners of the computer. They can add administrators, change critical settings, lock out the current owner, and so on.

Bear in mind that there’s no need to do this yourself to verify it. Doing so creates a “root” account that others may be able to take advantage of if you don’t disable it.

The glitch grants anyone to access the file system for a Mac, exposing private documents on that particular device.

The bug appears to have been first noticed by Lemi Orhan Ergin, founder of Software Craftsman Turkey, who noted it publicly on Twitter.

#MacOS flaw leaves your #personaldata exposed. Find out how to stay safe! Click to Tweet

Although Mac devices are generally regarded as extra secure and less prone to hacking and malware infections, this is a major and very dangerous flaw.

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Freedom on the Net Report 2017 reflects a worrying increase in digital censorship

Another year has passed in the realm of digital freedom, leaving the global situation more and more precarious, especially in the context of various elections taking place throughout the world.

According to Freedom House, which surveyed 65 countries for its ‘Freedom on the Net 2017’ report (87% of the world’s Internet users), the state of the Internet freedom around the world has little cause for celebration, as this year continues to present a world where few societies give their citizens access to a free, uncensored Internet.

Thus, nearly half of the 65 countries assessed in Freedom on the Net 2017 experienced declines during the coverage period, while just 13 made progress, most of it minor. Less than one-quarter of users reside in countries where the internet is designated free, meaning there are no major obstacles to access, excessive restrictions on content, or serious violations of user rights in the form of unchecked surveillance or unjust repercussions for legitimate speech.

However, in one of the world’s leading democracies, the United States, the use of “fake news”, automated “bot” accounts, and other manipulation methods gained particular attention and caused a decline in the country’s overall Internet freedom. While the online environment in the US remained generally free, it was troubled by a proliferation of fabricated news articles, as well as aggressive harassment of many journalists, both during and after the presidential election campaign.

 

The usual suspects and some unexpected improvements

Of the 65 countries assessed, 32 have been on an overall decline since June 2016. The biggest declines took place in Ukraine, Egypt, and Turkey.

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WiFi breach makes devices vulnerable to hacks, but there is a solution

Much to everyone’s concern, there have been discovered serious weaknesses in WPA2, a protocol that secures all modern protected Wi-Fi networks. An attacker within range of a victim can exploit these weaknesses using key reinstallation attacks (KRACKs), notes krackattacks.com.

The “Krack” attack works by exploiting the “handshake” that a WiFi network and a device give to each other when the latter wants to join. Usually, the two decide on an encryption key for all future traffic, meaning that each device will only be able to read data if it has that key.

“Note that if your device supports Wi-Fi, it is most likely affected,” wrote security researcher Mathy Vanhoef, whose work was noted by the US government.

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Qatar blocks VoIP apps such as WhatsApp and Skype; here’s how to access them

If you are traveling to Qatar these days or maybe are a resident who wishes to communicate more easily with his/her business partners or remote family, recent news points out to a new block on standard Voice over IP (VoIP) apps, such as Skype, Facetime, Duo, Viber, and WhatsApp.

Legally speaking, there are no laws or rules that prohibit VoIP services in Qatar, unlike in the UAE for example. However, it appears that according to the website of Qatar’s Communications Regulatory Authority (CRA), no person or business can sell VoIP calls or services without a license. And currently, only Ooredoo and Vodafone, Qatar’s sole two ISPs, are licensed to do this.

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