Tag - Snowden

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What is the FBI trying to achieve?
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One year after Snowden declared war to the NSA…
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The worth of your privacy

What is the FBI trying to achieve?

In the past few days, media reported about how parts of the US IT industry resist the espionage plans of the US government – triggered by Apple’s refusal to hack the phone of a suspect and prospectively install backdoors for secret services. What exactly is Apple required to do? And why is the company’s resistance so important? Also concerning VPNs …

For the first time in history, the government asks a company not just to assist in the investigation of an offense, request that no one would actually complain about; but publicly demanding Apple to develop a completely new software that makes the onsite security of its devices and features superfluous. This demand is affecting the security features that impact all Apple users and anyone who communicates with Apple’s users, and which are essential in the prevention of digital crimes. Bottom line, the company is forced to develop a master key that unlocks every single iOS device.

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What would be the new changes? If FBI is successful, three major changes should be implemented by Apple:

  • Currently, iOS can be adjusted so that it clears the internal keys after 10 unsuccessful password entries. FBI wants the software without this feature.
  • After each unsuccessful password entry to unlock a device, iOS prolongs the time until another attempt can be made. The FBI wants the new software to accept an infinite number of entries without breaks.
  • iOS requires that passwords are entered manually. The FBI would like the possibility to enter passwords electronically, so one can run automatically a variety of options in a short period of time.
FBI's demand is affecting all Apple users and anyone who communicates with them. #PrivateLivesMatter Click to Tweet

If FBI’s requests will be approved, not only would Apple suffer of a bigger image loss than the one triggered by the Snowden revelations, but there would arise a fatal situation for citizens and businesses alike. By default, built-in back doors would not only be available for the US government, but potentially for others as well, especially for known enemies of the western countries like Iran, North Korea and Russia, but also the competing national economies, hackers and cybercriminals.

It’s rather naïve to believe that for the sake of all citizens, governments are the only ones trying to keep an eye on encrypted data. This rather reveals how much the thinking of law enforcement agencies has developed in only one direction: understanding total surveillance with themselves as luminaries of the planet, morally unassailable and almost uncontrollable anyway.

Another step towards 1984 2.0

And it would be only the first step, because once the protection of devices is gone, VPNs are just the next target on the hit list. If Apple’s refusal fails in court, the enforcement of backdoors for encrypted Internet access via virtual networks is only a matter of time. And besides: US companies operate globally. What arguments will be used for denying the Chinese government to do the same? And the Iranian? Who then has the last word when it comes to separate the evil from the good? And how exactly is the Russian mass surveillance different from the US one?

 

One year after Snowden declared war to the NSA…

One year has passed since Edward Snowden left the US. He showed the world the NSA abusive use of online surveillance and how a real hero looks like.

One man sacrificed his life and welfare so that a world could benefit again from their privacy and dignity. We will never be able to thank you enough for this, Edward Snowden!

We want to celebrate this important moment with you, our readers, and encourage every internet user once more to start using one of the best anti-NSA weapon there is: CyberGhost VPN!

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Now, there are some things that all of us can do, from professionals to every single citizen of this world and that is to take our online privacy seriously and do the right steps to protect it, starting from today.

This means using the right privacy protection tools, being more aware of what we post online and generally, being more aware that what we say online may be interpreted different by different entities and organizations.

Even if you're not doing anything wrong

For one year now, we know that 2.7 billion people are possibly being mass surveyed by the NSA huge systems (physical size of 6 of the biggest IKEA stores, capable to store our entire lives).

Facebook doesn’t even charge for giving away data to NSA and 98% percent of the PRISM data has been collected from Google, Yahoo and Microsoft, but AOL, YouTube, Apple or Skype are also involved, according to Wikipedia and other important sources. Read More

The worth of your privacy

How much is your privacy worth?

Why is the NSA wrong, why is Edward Snowden right – and why should you matter in the first place? Because there seems to be little doubt Snowden did, what he did, for you, for our children and for a society he thought was worth fighting for. And, naturally, because Privacy matters!

Privacy makes a difference! Privacy is one of the most crucial ingredients to form a personality and the # 1 foundation of individuality – you know, that sort of thing that once told the free world from communism. No free citizen, be it in Berlin, New York, London, Paris, Bucharest, Rome, Buenos Aires, or Madrid can ever do without it, for privacy is necessary to express yourself and tell the world: “Hey, that’s me! I’m important and I’m not a number!” Or, to be more precise, one actually can do without it for some time, but then will be reduced to being just a citizen of, say, Peking or Pyongyang. Being watched, you don’t tell the world “Hey, that’s me”, for you might not be appropriate, wanted or acceptable the way you are. Being watched you’d instead quite probably tell the world “Hey, that’s what I think you’d like me to be”. If you still feel like telling the world anything at all.

You’re more of the practical kind and don’t care much about high flying intellectual ideas like ‘My personal data belongs to me’ as long as your country is in danger? Well, you don’t have to, for this is just a modern phrase for what you do all day long all the time without ever thinking about it: You close your curtains or Venetian blinds, whenever you want to. You shut your doors at night. You built a fence to mark your property. You put your letters inside an envelope and seal your packages properly. All that – and much more – like having a drink on your way home is … Privacy! It’s there, a right that comes by birth. And do you see any reasons to believe your country is safer, when your government confiscates your curtains and blinds, wants copies of your keys to enter your home whenever an unknown somebody feels like it, disrespects your fences, counts your drinks, reads the letters addressed to your loved ones and even notes the jokes you laugh about, when meeting your friends in your garage? And do you feel like justifying yourself, if you don’t see a single reason for a behavior like that?

So how come so many people look the other way when the same privacy is violated in the Internet? Because the Internet is a different planet? Because it belongs to a different generation? Or a different breed? It doesn’t. It’s simply a technical extension of your real life, another way to chitchat with your neighbors, to communicate with your children during their college-time, to visit your bank or walk through a mall. An email is still a letter, a chat is still a private communication and a Google hangout is still, well, a hangout. So, take a look again, and note that the Privacy you take for granted when sitting on your porch or in your living room deflagrates in a blink of an eye, when you enter the Internet or pick up your phone.

And that’s probably the most important message Edward Snowden has for us, before he will be declared a traitor and a criminal and his voice will vanish like so many voices before: While we enjoy the freedom somebody before us fought (and maybe died) for, we have the responsibility for ourselves and our children not to let us be kept away from the very same freedom just because evil speaks a pleasant language and tells us to sacrifice privacy for the sake of, well, some other form of privacy. Which one exactly that would be is on them, of course.

Now, do you have to fight the NSA, the guys that mostly come home from their jobs in the evening and enjoy the same World Series like you do? No! They do their every day jobs and like every professional, they do their best to be efficient. It’s a matter of laws, if they got no limits and it’s a politician’s job to define those laws. For you it’s ‘just’ a matter of showing both what you stand for. Sounds simple, but as we all know, it’s the hardest part to do in a functioning society, for we have to accept, that each generation owns the next generation the respect for the generation before and passes on correctly what once had been achieved. In this case: Privacy!

Privacy makes a different – and here enters CyberGhost the stage: These days we open our service for a limited time for the sake of spreading the message: Then you can answer yourself one of the most important questions of the 21st century: “How much is your privacy worth” and get a CyberGhost subscription for exactly that price. Make it count!

Enter the campaign here: www.worthofyourprivacy.com

 

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