Bad days for privacy

This month started with an article from ‘theatlantic.com’ pointing out, that a bill, ‚The Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act of 2011’, might kill internet privacy in the USA for good… for everyone.

Journalists in US say, that the bill could have a chain effect, because, as written, ‚The Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act of 2011’ doesn’t require, that someone be under investigation on child pornography charges in order for police to access their Internet history — being suspected of any crime is enough.

„That name is what brought the anecdote back to me. A better name for the child pornography bill would be The Encouragement of Blackmail by Law Enforcement Act. At issue is how to catch child pornographers. It’s too hard now, say the bill’s backers, and I can sympathize. It’s their solution that appalls me: under language approved 19 to 10 by a House committee, the firm that sells youInternet access would be required to track all of your Internet activity and save it for 18 months, along with your name, the address where you live, your bank account numbers, your credit card numbers, and IP addresses you’ve been assigned.”

Says theatlantic.com

Then on BlackBerry announced, that they will collaborate with the police and give private information of their users, that were supposed to be involved into London Riots.

Source: Guardian.co.uk

Also, David Cameron, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, announced new measures, that would restrict Twitter or other social networks.
“Social media services such as Twitter and mobile messaging systems could face restrictions after a review of their role by the police and intelligence services.”

Says The Telegraph