1
Unleash the VPN beast at its true power with the new CyberGhost for Windows tutorial
2
The new Swiss surveillance law or the false choice between privacy and security
3
Planned Server Maintenance September 2016
4
Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: FBI tells us to cover up our webcams, teen sues parents over Facebook pictures and more
5
Ransomware – what you need to know and how to stay safe
6
Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: the Opera server hack, NY students get a Privacy Officer and more
7
The most commonly used passwords. Is yours on the list?

Unleash the VPN beast at its true power with the new CyberGhost for Windows tutorial

We can’t believe that over two months have passed since we released our latest VPN for Windows, CyberGhost 6. In this period of time, we were delighted to discover your feedback and to take it into account in order to further improve our product.

Many of you contacted us with questions concerning all of our new app’s services and features. While our colleagues from Support answered every single query, we thought that a video tutorial could really show what CyberGhost 6 for Windows is really capable of.

Watch the video below and join us in our quest for a better, freer Internet!

Don’t already have CyberGhost? You can download it for free at this link.

The new Swiss surveillance law or the false choice between privacy and security

It happened on a Sunday, September 25th, a day which will probably go down in history. That is when Swiss voters approved a new surveillance law granting their national intelligence service greater powers to spy on “terrorist” suspects and cyber criminals.

A good initiative in theory, when put to practice, this new law would allow the authorities to tap phones, snoop on email and deploy hidden cameras and bugs, thus monitoring any potential suspects.

Of the 5 million voters, 65 percent supported this legislative initiative. The other 35 percent will just have to deal with this situation and find solutions for not being tracked (you can always try our free VPN, available on any platform).

swiss-surveillance_2

Any resemblance to the NSA is purely coincidental

Does this new law remind of the already notorious data-gathering machine developed by the NSA and revealed by Edward Snowden?

Not to Yannick Buttet, a politician and Christian Democratic Party vice president, who declared: “This is not generalized surveillance. It’s letting the intelligence services do their job.” Guy Parmelin, Swiss defence minister, said that with the new measures Switzerland was “leaving the basement and coming up to the ground floor by international standards”.

Until now, phone tapping and monitoring emails were banned in Switzerland.

Read More

Planned Server Maintenance September 2016

cyberghost maintenance

We have some important news for all the Ghosties out there.

We are constantly developing and working on our server park so you can enjoy the best VPN experience. This is why, from time to time, we need to undergo a maintenance which will shortly interrupt the service in a few countries.

Don’t worry because it won’t last more than 10 minutes for each server. All free users will be automatically redirected to the available servers. We kindly ask the premium users to connect to a different country for the short period of time when the one they are looking for is unavailable.

Without further ado here is the list of all the countries where the servers will be powered down for maintenance purposes:

Read More

Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: FBI tells us to cover up our webcams, teen sues parents over Facebook pictures and more

The world of cybersecurity and online privacy has seen a lot of important updates this week. While some of them may seem like too small an effort for all that needs to be done on this front, they are a sign that things are going in the right direction. In spite of the fact that they may be taking the longest possible way there.

hands-laptop-coffee

FBI thinks that our webcams need to be covered up for fear of hackers

Earlier this year, when Mark Zuckerberg covered the webcam of his laptop, everyone thought he might be exaggerating a little bit. But the FBI appear to be on the same wavelength and have advised everyone to take this simple measure and thus avoid being spied on. According to FBI director James Comey, this is one of the “sensible things” that people can do.

We also think that it’s a good idea, since more primitive devices, such as children’s toys, have been known to spy on their owners through webcams & microphones.

Read More

Ransomware – what you need to know and how to stay safe

Ransomware attacks take place on a daily basis and don’t discriminate when it comes to the domain. The medical system, for instance, has fallen victim to a recent ransomware epidemic, with numerous hospitals being required to pay in order to regain access to their precious databases, such as patient records.

Private users, even though not as profitable, are also targeted by the thousands on a daily basis. In the first half of the year, over 4,000 ransomware daily attacks took place worldwide, 3 times more than in 2015.

ransomware-illustration_bun

First things first, though. Let’s begin by defining ransomware. As the name already suggests, it is a type of malware designed to block access to a computer until a sum of money is paid. Companies, as well as private users, can fall victim to such cybercrimes, but the first ones are usually the most targeted since they are more profitable.

However, please note that paying the ransom does not guarantee that users will regain access to their data. It is best not to pay anyone. If your computer gets infected with ransomware, turn it off and disconnect it from the network. Then alert law enforcement and take your computer to a specialist who can remove the virus and give you access to your precious data once more.
Read More

Ghostie’s Weekly Digest: the Opera server hack, NY students get a Privacy Officer and more

The start of autumn anticipates an interesting last quarter of 2016, especially as online privacy begins to be taken more and more seriously. For instance, we were quite intrigued to discover that the New York State Education Department has appointed its first Privacy Officer charged with the task of protecting confidential student information. Discover more below:

data-privacy-mica

Opera resets users’ passwords after web service gets hacked

The Norway-based internet browser maker has declared in blog post that it “quickly blocked” an attack to its sync system. As a measure of precaution, all the Opera sync account passwords have been reset. Users have also been informed about this incident and asked to change their passwords. If you want to reset your password, go to this link.

Read More

The most commonly used passwords. Is yours on the list?

Passwords are not something we include in our day-to-day conversations. They are supposed to be secret and whenever we have to come up with one, we rarely ask for advice or look for online tips. Well, it seems that the secret is finally out. The most common passwords of 2015 have been revealed and ideas which seemed clever in the beginning have turned out to be quite the contrary…

hacker-mica

I will admit, I’m no better. Many years ago, when I was setting up my first e-mail account, I also used “password” for a very hard-to-break password myself. I also remember that this idea came with a feeling of satisfaction. I imagined that nobody would be able to think of such a cunning idea except for me. As it turns out, according to SplashData (provider of security applications and services for over 10 years), many others thought the same thing. Here are the other passwords commonly used in 2015 and where they stand compared to 2014:

Read More

© 2015 CyberGhost